A Geological History of Britain – Part 8

Jurassic: the seas return

The slides from the class can be found here: 2012_GHB_Lect8

An excellent overview of the Rhaetian of the UK is provided on the JNCC website here. It explains the stratigraphy, palaeontology, and where the Rhaetian can be seen.

A guide to the Lower Jurassic is available on the Geological Society website (click here).

Images from the JNCC volume “British Lower Jurassic Stratigraphy” can be found here.

A guide to the Middle and Upper Jurassic can be found on the Geological Society website (click here).

Images from the JNCC volume “British Middle Jurassic Stratigraphy” can be found here.

The story of the Middle Jurassic dinosaur from Rutland, Cetiosaurus oxoniensis, can be found on the website of Leicester’s New Walk Museum (click here).

Images from the JNCC volume “British Upper Jurassic Stratigraphy” can be found here.

A Geological History of Britain – part 7

New Red Sandstones – the Permian and Triassic

The slides from the lecture can be found here: 2012_GHB_Lect7

An excellent overview of the Permian and Triassic of the UK, listing the best places to see rocks of this interval, can be found on the JNCC website here.

An overview of the Permian can be found at the University of California Museum of Palaeontology website (Click here).  Its Triassic page can be found here.

The Geological Society introduction to the Permian can be found here, and its guide to the Triassic here.

Images from the JNCC book “Marine Permian of England” can be found here.

Images from the JNCC book “Permian and Triassic Red Beds and the Penarth Group of Great Britain” can be found here.

Detailed information on the origins of the Permo-Triassic minerals found in the limestones of the Great Orme, Llandudno, North Wales can be found here.

The first of two articles I’ve written on how Permian reptile tracks from the sandstones of Dumfries & Galloway led to the birth of ichnology can be found here.

A Geological History of Britain – part 6

Lime, sand and coal – the Carboniferous

The lecture slides for the class can be found here: 2012_GHB_Lect6_bw

An overview of the Carboniferous period is provided on the Natural England website here.

A free publication on the geology of the North Pennines can be found here.

A brief overview of the Yoredale Group in Northumberland National Park can be found here.

The story of Carboniferous oil and the first well in mainland Britain can be found here.

A Geological History of Britain – part 5

Silurian and Devonian – closure of Iapetus and the building of Britain

The lecture notes for class 5 are available as a pdf here: 2012_GHB_Lect5

Images from the GCR book “British Silurian Stratigraphy” can be found here.  They include a comparison of Murchison, Sedgwick and Lapworth’s stratigraphies with that recognized in the late 20th Century (which has since been modified, of course!).

Images from the GCR book “Caledonian Igneous Rocks of Great Britain” can be found here.  There are a LOT of pictures, and they include the Shetland and other Scottish ophiolites, and the various Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian igneous rocks of Scotland, the Lake District and Wales.

Images from the GCR book “Caledonian Structures in Britain South of the Midland Valley” can be found here.  They cover the Caledonian structural geology of the Southern Uplands, the Lake District, and Wales.

A Scottish Natural Heritage guide to the geology of south-west Scotland, including the Southern Uplands, can be downloaded by clicking here.  The SNH website includes a fair amount of other information on Scotland’s geology.

Charles Lapworth’s interpretation of the structure of the Southern Uplands can be found here.  A short biography of the man can be found here.

Images from the GCR book “The Old Red Sandstone of Great Britain” can be found here.  The Devonian fishes of Caithness and the Moray Firth are covered in detail in Chapter 6.

A Geological History of Britain – additional resources

Below is a list of general geological resources that might be of use or interest.

Geo-nealogy, or Where Do You Think You Were?

For those wanting online geological maps of the UK, the Geology of Britain viewer (BGS Open Geoscience) can be found here.

The Geological Society’s Brief Summary of British Stratigraphy can be found here.

A good overview of the geology of Plymouth (which helps make sense of the confusing geological map) can be downloaded here.

Online geological map resources for the USA (courtesy of the US Geological Survey) can be found here.

More specifically, geological maps of the San Francisco Bay region can be found here, and of Oakland here.

An online, interactive geological atlas of New Zealand can be found here.

Other useful links:

If you’re having trouble with all the different names for different intervals of geological time, the GeoWhen database is very useful. It aims to clear up the confusion over regional, national and archaic terms, and can be found here.

GeoScenic, the National Archive for Geological Photographs, can be found here. You can search for, view and download thousands of images from the vaults of the British Geological Survey.

The GCR (Geological Conservation Review) database can be found here. You can search for national geological sites of importance, some of which (e.g. Flamborough Head) have site accounts providing details on the geology of that locality.

The GCR also has an Image Bank, where the photos and figures from many of its geological volumes are available.  These vary from British Silurian Stratigraphy to the Quaternary of the Thames, via the Fossil Reptiles of Great Britain.  The full list of available volumes can be found here.

A Geological History of Britain – part 4

Old Lost Sea – the Iapetus Ocean and the Cambrian-Ordovician geology of Britain

The lecture notes to the class can be found here – 2012_GHB_Lect4

Palaeogeographical maps of Europe through time can be found in Ron Blakey’s library (Click here)

Palaeogeographical maps can also be found at Chris Scotese’s Paleomap website (Click here).

J. Tuzo Wilson’s seminal paper, ‘Did The Atlantic Ocean Close And Then Re-Open?’ can be found here – Tuzo_Wilson1966_Did_Atlantic_Reopen

An excellent run-through of the stages of the Wilson Cycle is available at the James Madison University website (Click here). Useful information can also be found from the University of Leicester (Click here).

The US Geological Survey has also published an excellent online guide to plate tectonics, This Dynamic Earth, which can be found here.

Regional geology

For an introduction to the geology of Pembrokeshire, click here.

For the story of Paradoxides davidis, the Cambrian trilobite that revealed an ocean, click here. A really excellent online guide to trilobites can be found here.

For a guide to the volcanic geology of Strumble Head, near Fishguard, click here.

For an explanation of ophiolites, focussing on an Iapetus example from Newfoundland, click here.

For a brief overview of Newfoundland’s role in the story of the Iapetus Ocean, click here.

Other links

A brief biography of Adam Sedgwick, father of the Cambrian, can be found here.

Simon Winchester’s book Atlantic is a good read.

A Geological History of Britain – Part 3

The Precambrian of England and Wales

The lecture notes for the class can be found here: 2012_GHB_Lect3.

The Precambrian Rocks of England and Wales (Joint Nature Conservation Committee) – the webpage can be found here, the first chapter can be found here, and a list of the geological localities can be found here.

The Neoproterozoic of England and Wales (Geological Society) can be found here.

GeoMon, an excellent new website on the geology of Anglesey can be accessed by clicking here.  (Should you wish to delve further, the paper comparing the Monian Terrane with modern-day Japan can be found here).

Case study – the Precambrian rocks and fossils of Charnwood:

The British Geological Survey has produced a series of geological walk guidebooks, including one on Charnwood Forest and Mountsorrel (Click here to find out how to buy it through the Ordnance Survey shop).

A guide to the geology of Bradgate Park & Swithland Wood, Leicestershire, has also been produced by the Natural Environment Research Council (Click here).

David Attenborough discusses the importance of the discovery of Precambrian fossils in Leicestershire (click here to listen).

Charnia @ 50 – a meeting held at Leicester University in 2007 to celebrate 50 years since the discovery of the Charnian fossils (Click here to read my report).

Other links

If you want to find out more about Aspidella terranovica, the fossil specimens from Newfoundland I showed in class, I have written a short piece about them here.

A Geological History of Britain – Part 2

Files, notes and links for the 2nd class: The Precambrian-Cambrian of Scotland

Lecture slides (as a pdf) – 2012_GHB_Lect2

The Geological Society: Lewisian, Torridonian and Moine (Click here)

The Geological Society: Dalradian (Click here)

Assynt’s geology – excellent and very detailed Leeds University site (Click here)

A document produced by the Joint Nature Conservancy Council, giving an introduction to and overview of the Precambrian geological history of Scotland (Click here)

The Highlands Controversy by David R. Oldroyd (Click here for more info)

A Geological History of Britain – Part 1

A few links for my University of York Lifelong Learning course:

The 1st lecture –  2012_GHB_Lect1

British Geological Survey – free “Climate Through Time” poster (Click here)

British Geological Survey – Open Geoscience resources (Click here)

Woodcock & Strachan (2012) Geological History of Britain & Ireland (Click here for the Student Companion site)

Geology Rocks – Tutorials on regional geology (Click here)

In Our Time, BBC Radio 4 – “The Geological Formation of Britain” (Click here)

And if you need mnemonics to help you remember the periods of geological time, I have produced some suggestions here.