About fossiliam

Palaeontologist/geologist in Hull and York. Can be found cricketing for Ovington CC. Can be found twittering as @fossiliam.

Professor Herring’s Natural Hystery

He’s not a real professor, he’s not a real herring, but Professor Herring’s #NaturalHystery is really happening this summer, and will be a really different tour of York!

Professor_Herring

Say hello to Professor Herring!

From volcanoes and cholera to unicorns and Patagonians, the (mostly) scientific tales of the city will be revealed in this unique Festival of Ideas event, kindly supported by the Holbeck Trust innovation fund.

Professor Herring will introduce participants to many strange and interesting characters as we meander around the city centre. Are their tales all true though?

What lies beneath these streets?

Find out on Sunday June 14th…!

 

(P.S. Unlike most guided tours of York, this event is free, and if we see any ghosts all participants will get their money back.)

Geological History of Britain (2015)

William Smith’s 1815 geological map of England and Wales.

The PowerPoint slides for my 2015 one-day course on the Geological History of Britain can be downloaded here:

1. Introduction: 2015_GHB_Part1

2. Cainozoic: 2015_GHB_Part2

3. Mesozoic: 2015_GHB_Part3

4. Palaeozoic: 2015_GHB_Part4

5. Proterozoic & Archaean: 2015_GHB_Part5

To view the files I produced for my 2012 evening class on the Geological History of Britain, which provide more detail on many of the topics introduced here, click the ‘GHB’ tab below this post, or follow this link: http://fossilhub.org/?tag=ghb.

To obtain a copy of the British Geological Survey’s ‘Climate Through Time’ poster, follow this link: http://www.bgs.ac.uk/discoveringGeology/climateChange/climateThroughTime.html.

To view the figures from the Geological History of Britain and Ireland book (Woodcock and Strachan 2012), follow this link: http://bcs.wiley.com/he-bcs/Books?action=index&bcsId=7187&itemId=1405193824.

To view the photos and figures from the Geological Conservation Review series of books on British geology, follow this link: http://www.thegcr.org.uk/ImageBank.cfm.

York: A Rocky History

Whilst you’re waiting with anticipation for the audio recording to go live on YouTube, here is a link to the PowerPoint slides for the Lifelong Learning public lecture I gave on Thursday 19th of February:

York_Rocky_History_SML

Upcoming Events:

Sat. 14th March 2015, 9.30am-4.30 pm – A Geological History of Britain, University of York.

Sun. 14th June 2015, 2pm and 3.30 pm – Professor Herring’s Natural Hystery of York. Festival of Ideas, York Museum Gardens.

Fri. 18th-Sun. 20th Sept. 2015 – Yorkshire Fossil Festival, Rotunda Museum, Scarborough.

An Introduction to Fossils

KimmClay_ammo

Notes (pdf) for my University of York CLL class “An Introduction to Fossils” on Nov. 29th: 2014_Intro_Fossils

Useful links

The challenges of taxonomy, or why reptiles don’t exist any more (article from The Conversation).

Trilobites.info – a marvellous and comprehensive website devoted to understanding trilobites.

The Burgess Shale – Cambrian lagerstatte website from the Royal Ontario Museum (including a Virtual Sea Odyssey).

Primeval Predators – the plastic version of the Burgess Shale!

The Palaeontological Association – promoting palaeontology (also with a Facebook page and a Twitter account).

The Micropalaeontological Society – for lovers of smaller fossils.

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(N. B. Clicking the tag ‘fossils‘ will also bring up plenty of other links and resources on this website).

 

Intro To Gcl Maps 8

Time, and other geological maps

Geological time spiral (from Wikimedia Commons)

Week 8 lecture notes (pdf): 2014_IntroGclMaps_8

An aeromagnetic anomaly map of the Humber-Trent region (from the BGS).

The World digital magnetic anomaly map, or WDMAM project.

A gravity anomaly map of the Humber-Trent region (from the BGS).

Overview of gravity anomaly maps and the shape of the Earth (from NASA).

Gravity map traces ocean circulation (BBC News story). For more information on the GOCE research, visit the project website. There is even an online brochure giving ‘New Views Of Dynamic Earth’.

The G-BASE project, providing geochemical maps of Great Britain (from the BGS).

Geochemical maps of the Irish borders (from the Tellus project).

A hydrogeological map of southern Yorkshire, including York (from the BGS).

A geological map of the asteroid Vesta (from the Wired Map Lab).

Intro To Gcl Maps 6

Igneous rocks

Granite.

Lecture notes for week 6 (pdf) – 2014_IntroGclMaps_6

Igneous rocks

Igneous rocks – a picture guide from Geology.com

Igneous rocks in Britain – a simple map from the Geological Society of London.

Ordovician igneous rocks in Britain – a locality map from the GCR.

Maps of intrusive igneous structures – a guide from TU Delft.

The evolution of geological mapping

Macculloch’s magnificent map – an article from New Scientist.

Lapworth’s map worth – historic geological maps from the Lapworth Museum of Geology.

Archibald Geikie’s 1876 geological map of Scotland – from the University of Leeds.

The Assynt Culmination – from the BGS.

Solid & Drift

The 2010 paper on mapping the Vale of York bedrock and superficial geology can be downloaded here.

Geological time

International Chronostratigraphic Chart (2014) – official geological time scale.

Intro To Gcl Maps 5

Unconformities

Siccar Point unconformity (photo by Anne Burgess, Wikimedia Commons)

Week 5 Lecture slides (pdf) – 2014_IntroGclMaps_5

Lecture notes on unconformities (doc) – Unconformities

The Making of Siccar Point – excellent blogpost by Highly Allochthonous about this famous unconformity.

University of Leeds Introduction to Structural Geology – Geological Maps workbook.

Digital technology and the future of geological fieldwork – paper from the Journal of the Geological Society of London.

Intro To Gcl Maps 4

An Introduction To Geological Maps – Week 4

Lecture notes (pdf) – 2014_IntroGclMaps_4

Faults, Earthquakes and Landscape – a guide from the Geology Cafe website.

Teaching Resources in Structural Geology – courtesy of the University of Leeds.

The Rock Cycle: Faults – web resource from the Geological Society of London.

Geologizing With Darwin – a Scientific American blogpost about Charles Darwin’s training in geological mapping.

Llanymynech Rocks! – my blogpost about Darwin and the geology of the Anglo-Welsh border.